egregiousrecursion
acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

acquaintedwithrask:

strampunkgear:

foreverdisneynerd:

For Atlantis, Disney needed a new language for the Atlantean people. To do this, Disney hired Mark Okrand, the man who also created the famous Klingon and Vulcan for the Star Trek series. In the Atlantean language, Mark Okrand’s main source for it’s roots and stems of its words are Proto-Indo-European,but as Okrand also described it as being the “tower of babel” or “root dialect” for all languages in the world, he also used ancient Chinese, Latin, Greek, Biblical Hebrew, along with many other ancient languages or their reconstructions. As such, you can actually learn to write and speak the language!

This film is so underrated it hurts.

ah this explains how they understood french and english so well almost instantly… better than the magical wind in Pocahontas that’s for sure

So Long Takahata?

With the retirement of Isao Takahata, the imaginative director of Castle in the Sky, may come an end to the golden age of Studio Ghibli. Takahata walks in the shadow of his esteemed partner Hayao Miyazaki, but both men have dedicated their lives to the beauty of animated motion picture. We can only hope these two great dreamers continue sharing their imaginations with us even after their departure from Studio Ghibli.


May dreams continue to be dreamt, and the magic of Takahata and Miyazaki continue yet!

Check out this article about Takahata’s latest and possibly last film, The Tale of Princess Kaguya

http://ajw.asahi.com/article/cool_japan/culture/AJ201311200012

"Frozen" Soundtrack Fun Fact

Being the amateur ethnomusicologist and soundtrack junkie I am, here’s a little known fact about the Frozen soundtrack: the very first song you hear at the beginning of the movie, “Vuelie” a capella, is in fact an adaptation of a composition by Frode Fjellheim of Norway. His piece, entitled “Cantus Eatnemen Vuelie,” is actually an arrangement of a famous Martin Luther hymn combined with Norwegian folk music motives.

image

The more you know.

Have a listen to Fjellheim’s original work. You won’t be disappointed:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zxiB43Ez4qQ

Bonjour

Bonjour monsieurs et mademoiselles, my name is Stephen and I’m an audiophile/amateur multi-hobbyist here to share rants, musings, and some of my creations here and there. For starters here’s a link to my SoundCloud page: https://soundcloud.com/stephenabbott-1

I enjoy composing music pieces, writing short stories and poetry, and collecting die-cast model aircraft. I hope to be merging my current model aviation blog onto tumblr here in the near future and I’ll be sure to let you know about that. But in the meantime it’d be lovely pleasure to meet new virtual faces. I’m new around here, obviously, but it’s about time I find an appropriate outlet for my diagonal humor and disruptive musings.